Australia Learner Licence

Australia Learner Licence

A learner licence is gained after: (a) the minimum driving age of 16 is met; (b) passing a touch-screen computer-based test Driver Knowledge Test; (c) provide identification; and (d) pass an eyesight test.[6] Learners are permitted to drive accompanied by a supervising unrestricted licence holder. Learners are subject to numerous restrictions: (a) a maximum speed of 90 km/h; (b) a zero blood alcohol content limit; (c) cannot tow a trailer; and (d) and must conspicuously display black-on-yellow “L-plates” on the exterior of the vehicle while driving. Learners must complete at least 120 hours of driving practice including 20 hours of night driving and hold the learner licence for at least 12 months before a provisional P1 licence is issued. Since 16 December 2009, one hour with an instructor is equal to three hours of normal driving hours until a total of ten hours with an instructor. This equates to a maximum of 30 hours which can be accumulated at an advanced rate .Since 19 December 2009, learner drivers 25 years old and over are not required to complete a learner driver log book and are exempt from the twelve-month tenure

Provisional P1 Licence

A provisional P1 licence (commonly called Ps and Reds) is gained after: (a) a minimum twelve months of holding a learner licence; (b) 120 hours (20 hours night drive between sunset and sunrise) of on-road driving experience; and (c) pass a driving test. The licence holder can drive unaccompanied but is limited to a maximum speed of 90 km/h, towing trailers of up to 250 kg  and a zero alcohol content. Red-on-white “P-plates” must be displayed while driving. P1 drivers are limited to a total of four demerit points during the term of the licence, as compared to the thirteen-point limit on unrestricted licences] P1 drivers must hold the licence for one year before progressing to the next stage.

Provisional P2 Licence

A provisional P2 licence (commonly known as Ps and Greens) is gained after one year and successful completion of a computerised hazard perception test. The driver is restricted to a speed limit of 100 km/h, a zero alcohol limit and a maximum of seven demerit points; however, they are eligible to upgrade the class of their licence, such as those for heavier vehicles.P2 drivers must conspicuously display a green-on-white “P-plate” on the exterior of the vehicle at all times. P2 drivers must hold the licence for two years before progressing to the next stage.

Full Licence
A full, unrestricted licence is gained after two years and successful completion of another computerized test. Unrestricted drivers licences are colored gold. More Read : www.darshandrivingschool.com.au

Choosing a Driving School

Choosing professional driving instruction is one way to help ready yourself safely for the road.

A driver training course or high-school driver education program approved by the provincial government can teach you the skills and attitudes you need to be a safe and responsible driver. You may also be eligible to take your road test sooner and to save money on insurance premiums.

To help you choose the best driving school and course for you, use the following checklist of features:

  • Course information package
  • Audio visual equipment
  • Classroom facilities
  • In-vehicle topics covered
  • Risk perception and management
  • Driving in adverse conditions
  • Instructor qualifications and experience
  • Student progress and evaluation reports
  • Minimum 25 classroom and 10 behind-
    the-wheel instruction hours
  • Certification fee
  • Tuition receipts
  • Testimonials
  • Personalized program
  • Low student/teacher ratio
  • Basic man oeuvres
  • Strategic driving
  • Freeway driving
  • Night driving
  • Regular instructor upgrading
  • Certificate of completion
  • Training materials
  • Use of vehicle for road test
  • Registered educational institution
  • Number of years in business
  • Consumer protection insurance

offences resulting in driving licence cancellation

Drink or drug driving offence
If your licence has been cancelled solely because of a drink or drug driving offence, your re-licensing requirements will vary depending on circumstances. The requirements are explained in the brochure Getting your licence back [PDF, 327KB, 12pp] . You may also be subjected to an alcohol interlock order as part of the re-issuing condition of your licence.

Other offences resulting in licence cancellation or driving disqualification
If your licence has been cancelled or you have been disqualified from driving because of one of the offences listed below, you must apply to the Court to have your licence restored to you. This is called a Licence Eligibility Order (LEO).

• Serious motor vehicle offence
• Police pursuit offence
• Stealing or attempting to steal a vehicle offence
• Non-road safety offence


Before you apply for an LEO, please ensure that all driving bans requiring a LEO have been completed before the LEO hearing.

For more information on what you are required to do in order to apply to become re-licensed, check out the Driver’s Licence Eligibility Guide on the Magistrate’s Court of Victoria website.
I’ve received my LEO from the Court – what next?
Once you have received your LEO from the court you will need to attend a VicRoads Customer Service Centre with your LEO to have your licence re-issued or to book your learner permit test.

If you have outstanding driving bans on your record, VicRoads will not be able to re-issue your licence until all outstanding bans have been served. If any of these outstanding bans require an LEO, you must return to Court to obtain an LEO at the end of these bans. It is therefore recommended that you serve all of your bans and obtain one LEO to cover all bans.

If you were found to have committed the offence under the influence of alcohol, on granting the LEO, the Court may order the imposition of an Alcohol Interlock condition on your licence or permit.
If you’re a probationary driver and your licence has been suspended due to a non-road safety offence, your probationary period will be extended by the same period as your suspension period.
Alcohol interlocks
The Court may impose a condition requiring an alcohol interlock device to be fitted to your vehicle for a period of time.

Information relating to the Alcohol Interlock can be found on the Alcohol Interlocks website.

Driver Education Programs and assessments
If you commit a drink driving or drug driving offence you may be required to complete an education course or obtain assessment reports to get your licence back or to avoid having your licence cancelled.

All drink drive assessments and courses are developed, administered and conducted by the Department of Human Services. www.darshandrivingschool.com.au

Road safety benefits

Road safety benefits
Research from around the world has shown that ISA can significantly reduce travel speeds and threfore crashes. Research undertaken by the TAC and MUARC in Australia estimates that ISA can reduce fatal and serious injury crashes by up to eight per cent.

VicRoads Repeat Speeders Trial
The results of a landmark study of Victorian motorists with a history of speeding has found that using speed alert devices can reduce speeding and potentially save lives.

VicRoads designed and conducted two trials; one involving repeat speeders attending a behaviour change discussion group, while the other used advisory ISA technology to warn drivers they were speeding. Researchers from the Monash University Accident Research Centre independently evaluated the trials.

Environmental benefits
Local and international research also indicates that the use of ISA produces fewer fluctuations in travel speed which results in a higher fuel efficiency and a subsequent decrease in vehicle emissions.

Some portable satellite navigation (GPS) devices already have speed limit information in them and can be set to provide a warning to drivers if they travel over the speed limit. www.darshandrivingschool.com.au

Road safety for children on skateboards, scooters and wheeled toys

Any wheeled device on the road is regarded the same as pedestrians under the road rules. This includes skateboards, rollerblades, children’s scooters, pedal cars or tricycles – any wheeled toys.

As well as general pedestrian rules, there are also additional rules that parents should know and ensure that their child not only knows, but understands. Most of the suggestions we outline for walking and road safety as well as bicycle road safety also apply to wheeled toys.

Road safety for children on skateboards, scooters and wheeled toys

Below are some tips for children using a range of wheeled toys and devices near roads.

  • Wheeled devices or toys cannotbe used:
    • on a road with a speed limit of more than 60 km/h
    • on a road with a dividing line or median strip or
    • on a one-way road with more than one marked lane
  • They must keep to the left on footpaths and shared paths and give way to pedestrians.
  • Unless a sign prohibits it, a person on roller blades, roller skates or a similar wheeled device can ride on a bicycle path or separated footpath designed for the use of bicycles, but must give way to any bicyclist.
  • It is an offence (and extremely dangerous) to hold on to a moving vehicle
  • Correct fitting helmets must be worn

Make sure your children know the road rules when they are using a skateboard or scooter or similar device with wheels. This means they are in the best position to prevent any injury to themselves or to others. www.darshandrivingschool.com.au

VicRoads Road Services deliver quality maintenance

Based in 23 centres around Victoria, Road Services staff cater to diverse geographical needs to ensure the road network is safe for local communities.

Our Services

We provide:

  • 24/7 on-call support
  • traffic management
  • accident and emergency services

Routine, periodic and provisional maintenance

  • routine pavement works
  • pothole patching
  • crack sealing
  • roadside management
  • vegetation maintenance
  • drainage maintenance and improvements
  • slip repairs, wire rope and guard rail installation and repairs
  • rest area maintenance and cleaning
  • debris removal
  • road inspections.
    Construction services

    • pavement repairs (including digoutspavement reconstruction)
    • pavement sealing
    • public transport works
    • road safety improvement works
    • technical and design construction advice.

    Bridge work services

    • bridge inspections
    • treatments
    • emergency bridging
    • bridge maintenance

    Contact your local Road Services Operations Manager to discuss works requirements:

    • Metro North West (Deer Park)
    • Metro South East (Dandenong,Kew and Lilydale)
    • South Western (Geelong, Derrinallum, Hamilton and Warrnambool)
    • Western (Horsham, Ballarat, Ouyen and Red Cliffs)
    • Eastern (Morwell, Sale, and Bairnsdale)
    • Northern (Bendigo, Kyneton and Swan Hill)

    http://www.darshandrivingschool.com.au

Your learner permit card or original evidence of identity documents

Category A documents
One of the following documents must be current or expired by no more than two years:

  • Australian photo drivers licence or permit photo card
  • Victorian Marine licence photo card
  • Victorian Firearm licence photo card
  • Victorian Security Guard/Crowd Controller photo card
  • Australian passport
  • An overseas passport. (If expired by no more than two years it is acceptable if accompanied by a current Australian visa (e.g. permanent residency or a temporary visa)
  • document of identity issued by the Passport Office (usually issued to travellers to Norfolk Island)
  • Australian police force officer photo identity card
  • Consular photo identity card issued by the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade
  • Full Australian birth certificate or change of name registration issued by the Registry of Births, Deaths and Marriages. (Note: Birth extracts and Commemorative birth certificates are not accepted)
  • Australian naturalisation or citizenship certificate, or a Document for Travel to Australia or a Visa Evidence Card or after 1/04/2013 an ImmiCard, issued by the Department of Immigration and Citizenship or the Passport Office (read note 1)
  • NSW Photo Card (issued by NSW RMS after 14 December 2008)
  • Birth card (issued by NSW RTA (now RMS) prior to August 2008)
  • Current photo image held by VicRoads regardless of date the photo was captured, provided the identity has previously been confirmed.
  • A Community Detention Letter of Introduction issued by the Department of Immigration and Citizenship or the Passport Office is sufficient proof for both residence and identity.
  • Resolution of Status (RoS) visa (previously known as Temporary Protection Visa (TPV)/Temporary Humanitarian Visa (THV)

Category B documents
One of these documents:

  • state or federal government employee photo ID card
  • Medicare card
  • Department of Veteran’s Affairs card
  • Pensioner Concession card
  • current entitlement card issued by the Commonwealth
  • student identity card
  • any Australian or overseas credit card or account card from a bank, building society or credit union
  • Working with Children Check card
  • Australian Proof of Age card
  • Australian Keypass card
  • Australian Defence Force photo identity card (excluding civilian staff).

serious errors Driving test

Collision 
Crashing into another vehicle or road user (eg. pedestrian or bicyclist) will immediately end your test and you will fail.  Even a small collision is a sign that you need to develop more safety-related skills before driving on your own.
Mounting the kerb
Hitting or running into the kerb or footpath is a serious safety issue. It puts pedestrians and other road users at risk and is a sign that you do not have safe control of the car. This will immediately end your test and you will fail. This penalty is less severe if you hit the kerb gently while performing a reverse-park. This error is a potential safety problem. It suggests you need more practice with this manoeuvre, but it usually doesn’t place anyone in immediate danger.
Speeding
Driving too fast for the conditions and exceeding the speed limit causes crashes. Speed related crashes are a big problem for young drivers. The speed limit is the maximum safe speed at which you should drive. If you exceed the speed limit by more than 5 km/h during your test drive the test will be stopped and you will fail. This is regarded as a serious error because it creates an unsafe situation.

It is also a serious error to exceed the speed limit by any amount. Exceeding the speed limit by even a small amount may result in a penalty.

If the traffic is very busy and moving at a speed slower than the speed limit, you should choose an appropriate speed to fit into the traffic flow.  However you may be penalised if you drive too slowly for the conditions during the test because you are meant to be driving in normal, day-to-day driving conditions.
Failing to Give Way, Look, or Signal
Other drivers should not have to avoid a collision because of something you have done while driving.  It is your responsibility to choose a safe gap when you are entering traffic, turning at an inter-section, changing lanes, or merging.

If you fail to give way to another road user and they have to avoid a collision with you, the test will be terminated and you will fail. This is a serious, safety-related error.

Entering traffic, turning, or changing lanes without looking or signalling is obviously dangerous. Even if there are no other cars around, this type of behaviour increases the risk of a collision. For this reason it is treated as a serious error and you may fail the test if you don’t look or signal when required.


Stopping the Car

When you stop the car – either to park or at an intersection – you must stop in a safe position.  This means that your car should not be in a position where other road users have to change their behaviour to avoid you.

You will fail the test if other drivers or road users do have to avoid your car, and you may fail if you stop in a location where other drivers or road users might have to avoid you.
Stop Signs and Traffic Lights
It is not unusual for licence applicants to fail the on-road test because they go through a Stop sign or traffic light without stopping. This is very unsafe behaviour. You are required to STOP at a Stop sign or red traffic signal.

If you do not stop at a red traffic signal or red arrow that applies to you, the test will be terminated and you will fail. This is extremely risky behaviour.

If you drive through a Stop sign the test will be terminated and you will fail.

Some experienced drivers do the wrong thing by slowing down at a Stop sign to observe for hazards without actually stopping the wheels of the car completely.  This is illegal and may not be safe – you will be penalised if you do this in the test. You will have a Critical Error recorded and may end up failing the test even if there were no potential hazards nearby. If you create an unsafe situation by doing this, the test will be terminated and you will fail.  You must Stop at a Stop sign.
Any Other Unsafe Situations
The licence testing officer is able to terminate the test if you do anything that creates an unsafe situation. The licence testing officer is able to terminate the test to prevent an unsafe situation occurring. You are being assessed on your ability to drive safely so you, your passengers, and any other road users are not put at risk. If you do something that creates an unsafe situation, this is a sign that you are not ready to drive on your own.

If someone else does something that creates an unsafe situation, you will not be penalised as long as you detect the problem and react safely.
Any Other Illegal Actions
There are many road rules and you are expected to know them all and obey them – during the driving test and whenever you are driving.

If you disobey a road rule but it doesn’t put you or other road users (or property) at risk, a Critical Error will be recorded and you may end up failing the test. So it pays to be careful about obeying the rules.

Drinking alcohol can affect your driving

  • Slowing down your reaction time – this can be crucial in an emergency situation
  • Dulling your thinking processes, making it difficult to multi-task – an essential skill reducing your attention span – not noticing other drivers and/ or vehicles
  • Causing short-term side effects such as blurred vision and reduced hearing – reducing your ability to drive safely and identify driving hazards.

What is BAC?
BAC is a measurement of the amount of alcohol in your body, expressed as grams of alcohol per 100ml of blood. Hence, for fully licensed car drivers the legal limit of 0.05 BAC means 0.05gm alcohol per 100ml of blood. For special licence categories such as learner and probationary drivers, taxi, bus, train and heavy truck drivers, the legal limit is zero (0) BAC or 0.02 (which in practice means no alcohol at all).

A driver’s BAC is measured by a simple breath test procedure. If tested by the police, drivers must be below their allowable legal limit. A glass of champagne (11.5 per cent alcohol), or a 375ml stubby or can of full strength beer (4.9 per cent alcohol) are all 1.5 standard alcoholic drinks.

To keep under the 0.05 BAC limit, males can drink no more than two (2) standard alcoholic drinks in the first hour (10gm of alcohol in each) followed by one (1) standard alcoholic drink every hour after that. However, females can drink no more than one (1) standard alcoholic drink every hour.

Danger increases the more you drink
0.02 to 0.05 BAC – your ability to see or locate moving lights correctly is reduced, as is your ability to judge distances. Your tendency to take risks is increased, and your ability to respond to several stimuli is decreased.

At 0.05 BAC drivers are twice (2) as likely to have a crash as before they started drinking.

0.05 to 0.08 BAC – your ability to judge distances reduces further, sensitivity to red lights is impaired, reactions are slower, and concentration span is shorter.

At 0.08 BAC drivers are five (5) times more likely to have a crash than before they started drinking. At 0.08 to 0.12 BAC – “euphoria” sets in – you overestimate your abilities, which leads you to drive recklessly, your peripheral vision is impaired (resulting in accidents due to hitting vehicles while passing), and your perception of obstacles is impaired. Drivers are up to ten (10) times more likely to have a crash.

How does alcohol affect me?

Alcohol is a drug that slows down your body, both physically and mentally. Excessive drinking affects your judgment, memory and reaction time. It takes much longer for your body to expel alcohol than to absorb it, so you can drink a large quantity of alcohol in the evening and still have alcohol present in your body the next day, affecting your driving and other activities.

It’s important to note that these guidelines are general and a range of factors can influence an individual’s BAC, such as your body size, age, level of fitness, liver health, gender, medication, when you last ate and the type of food you ate.