Australia Learner Licence

Australia Learner Licence

A learner licence is gained after: (a) the minimum driving age of 16 is met; (b) passing a touch-screen computer-based test Driver Knowledge Test; (c) provide identification; and (d) pass an eyesight test.[6] Learners are permitted to drive accompanied by a supervising unrestricted licence holder. Learners are subject to numerous restrictions: (a) a maximum speed of 90 km/h; (b) a zero blood alcohol content limit; (c) cannot tow a trailer; and (d) and must conspicuously display black-on-yellow “L-plates” on the exterior of the vehicle while driving. Learners must complete at least 120 hours of driving practice including 20 hours of night driving and hold the learner licence for at least 12 months before a provisional P1 licence is issued. Since 16 December 2009, one hour with an instructor is equal to three hours of normal driving hours until a total of ten hours with an instructor. This equates to a maximum of 30 hours which can be accumulated at an advanced rate .Since 19 December 2009, learner drivers 25 years old and over are not required to complete a learner driver log book and are exempt from the twelve-month tenure

Provisional P1 Licence

A provisional P1 licence (commonly called Ps and Reds) is gained after: (a) a minimum twelve months of holding a learner licence; (b) 120 hours (20 hours night drive between sunset and sunrise) of on-road driving experience; and (c) pass a driving test. The licence holder can drive unaccompanied but is limited to a maximum speed of 90 km/h, towing trailers of up to 250 kg  and a zero alcohol content. Red-on-white “P-plates” must be displayed while driving. P1 drivers are limited to a total of four demerit points during the term of the licence, as compared to the thirteen-point limit on unrestricted licences] P1 drivers must hold the licence for one year before progressing to the next stage.

Provisional P2 Licence

A provisional P2 licence (commonly known as Ps and Greens) is gained after one year and successful completion of a computerised hazard perception test. The driver is restricted to a speed limit of 100 km/h, a zero alcohol limit and a maximum of seven demerit points; however, they are eligible to upgrade the class of their licence, such as those for heavier vehicles.P2 drivers must conspicuously display a green-on-white “P-plate” on the exterior of the vehicle at all times. P2 drivers must hold the licence for two years before progressing to the next stage.

Full Licence
A full, unrestricted licence is gained after two years and successful completion of another computerized test. Unrestricted drivers licences are colored gold. More Read : www.darshandrivingschool.com.au

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Drive responsibly and driving rules

Driving in traffic is more than just knowing how to operate the mechanisms which control the vehicle; it requires knowing how to apply the rules of the road (which govern safe and efficient sharing with other users). An effective driver also has an intuitive understanding of the basics of vehicle handling and can drive responsibly.

A driver is subject to the laws of the jurisdiction in which he or she is driving. Most countries also have differing laws against driving whilst under the influence of alcohol or drugs..Motorists are almost universally required to take lessons with an approved instructor and to pass a driving test before being granted a license. Almost all countries allow all adults with good vision and health to apply to take a driving test and, if successful, to drive on public roads.

A driving test (also known as a driving exam, driver’s test, or road test) is a procedure designed to test a person’s ability to drive amotor vehicle. It exists in various forms worldwide, and is often a requirement to obtain a driver’s license. A driving test generally consists of one or two parts: the practical test, called a road test, used to assess a person’s driving ability under normal operating conditions, and/or a written or oral test (theory test) to confirm a person’s knowledge of driving and relevant rules and laws.To make the test fair, written driving tests are normally standardized tests, meaning that everyone takes the same test under the same conditions. In many places the test can be done by computer, and typically consists of questions related to road signs and traffic laws of the respective country, but may also include questions related to road safety best practices or technical questions regarding vehicle operation and maintenance. In many countries passing a written driving test is required for admission to the practical test.

Depending on the country and on the driver’s license category, the practical test includes driving on the public, open road as well as different maneuverability test, which are usually carried out in a controlled environment such as:driving back and forth through a set of traffic cones reversing around a corner or into a parking space, with or without a trailer or semi-trailer emergency stops or evasive maneuvers coupling and de-coupling of a trailer to a truck, which includes establishing the electrical and compressed-air connections and checking them maintaining a motorcycle stable at low speed Make sure your children know the road rules when they are using a skateboard or scooter or similar device with wheels. This means they are in the best position to prevent any injury to themselves or to others. www.darshandrivingschool.com.au

Choosing a Driving School

Choosing professional driving instruction is one way to help ready yourself safely for the road.

A driver training course or high-school driver education program approved by the provincial government can teach you the skills and attitudes you need to be a safe and responsible driver. You may also be eligible to take your road test sooner and to save money on insurance premiums.

To help you choose the best driving school and course for you, use the following checklist of features:

  • Course information package
  • Audio visual equipment
  • Classroom facilities
  • In-vehicle topics covered
  • Risk perception and management
  • Driving in adverse conditions
  • Instructor qualifications and experience
  • Student progress and evaluation reports
  • Minimum 25 classroom and 10 behind-
    the-wheel instruction hours
  • Certification fee
  • Tuition receipts
  • Testimonials
  • Personalized program
  • Low student/teacher ratio
  • Basic man oeuvres
  • Strategic driving
  • Freeway driving
  • Night driving
  • Regular instructor upgrading
  • Certificate of completion
  • Training materials
  • Use of vehicle for road test
  • Registered educational institution
  • Number of years in business
  • Consumer protection insurance

International driving permits in Victoria

International Driving Permits (IDP’s) are recommended when you intend driving overseas.

In Australia, the Government appointed the Australian Automobile Association (AAA) as the only authority to issue permits. In Victoria, the RACV, as a constituent member of the AAA, is authorised to issue IDP’s through its RACV shops (external website).

An IDP is a widely recognised document and is useful for photo identification purposes. You may also need one to rent a car overseas.

Using an International Driving Permit in Victoria
An international driving permit represents a translation of an overseas driver licence. It has no validity on its own and must accompany a current overseas driver licence issued from your home licensing authority overseas.

An international driving permit is only valid if it:

  • complies with the UN convention for International Driving Permits, and
  • is issued by the country the overseas driver licence is issued in; and
  • is accompanied by a current overseas driver licence from the same country the permit was issued in.

Driving test in Vicroads

Pre-drive check
You must be able to start the engine, know where the controls listed below are and know how to use them. If any of these controls don’t work properly your test cannot continue.

  • Indicators
  • Wiper/washer controls
  • Horn
  • Headlights (high and low beam)
  • Hazard lights
  • Demister
  • Handbrake
  • Brake light

During the test you must keep your vehicle’s headlights on low beam, turn off any speed warning devices and turn off the cruise control.

First part – basic driving ability
The first part is designed to assess your safety as a driver in less challenging conditions. You will spend about ten minutes driving then stop the car while the licence test officer calculates your score. If you do anything unsafe, the drive test will be terminated and you will fail. Read more about how your driving is assessed.

The testing officer will give you simple, clear instructions during the test (eg. at the next street, turn right). You must follow their instructions and show that you can drive safely and efficiently. If you’re unsure of an instruction, ask for it to be repeated.

The first part may include:

  • starting and stopping the car
  • left and right at intersections
  • changing lanes
  • reverse parking
  • doing a three point-turn.

Talk to your driving instructor or supervising driver if you’re unsure about how to do these.

Second part – driving on busier roads
If you pass the first part you will progress to the second part. The second part is conducted in busier traffic. It is designed to assess your ability to safely execute normal, day-to-day driving tasks.  It will take about 20 minutes to complete.

The testing officer will give you simple, clear instructions during the test (eg. at the next street, turn right). You must follow their instructions and show that you can drive safely and efficiently. If you’re unsure of an instruction, ask for it to be repeated.

Part two may include:

  • Driving in busy traffic
  • Changing lanes
  • Merging with other traffic
  • Driving on straight and curved roads.

If you do anything unsafe, the drive test will be stopped and you will fail. Read more about how your driving is assessed.

Feedback about your results
The licence testing officer will give you feedback whether you pass or fail. You will be told if there are areas of your driving that need improvement.

If you fail, this feedback could help you in your next attempt. If you didn’t do well on one or two aspects of the test, you will know which areas to focus on and practice before your next attempt.  If you pass, this feedback will help you to become a safer driver.

Causes of failing could include:

Feedback like this suggests that you need more practice. People develop safe driving skills at different rates. Some learners need more practice than others before they are ready for the test.

Eligibility to qualify for a Victorian driver licence

The requirement to change your overseas driver licence to a Victorian driver licence depends on whether your stay in Victoria is temporary or permanent.

If you are in Victoria on a temporary visa, you can drive on your overseas driver licence for as long as it is current providing it is in English or accompanied by an English translation or International Driving Permit. There is no requirement to get a Victorian driver licence.

If you have entered Victoria on a permanent visa issued under the Migration Act 1958, you may drive on your overseas driver licence for:

  • six months from the date you first entered Australia if the permanent visa was issued before you entered Australia; or,
  • six months from the date when the permanent visa was issued to you if the permanent visa was issued to you whilst in Australia.

If you want to continue driving in Victoria after this time you must change your overseas licence to a Victorian driver licence.

New Zealand residents who hold a current licence are treated as interstate drivers.

Eligibility to qualify for a Victorian licence
Victorian full driver licence
To obtain a Victorian full driver licence you must:

  • be 21 years of age or older; and
  • hold an overseas full driver licence; or
  • have held an overseas probationary driver licence for at least three years from your 18th birthday (you must provide evidence).

Your overseas driver licence must be current or not expired by more than five years. Any period where you have been suspended or disqualified from driving is excluded when calculating the period of time you have held a licence.

Victorian probationary driver licence
To obtain a Victorian probationary driver licence you must be at least 18 years of age. No exemptions apply.

An appropriate probationary period (P1 or P2) will apply, depending on your age and the amount of time your overseas driver licence has been held (you must provide evidence). Any period where you have been suspended of disqualified from driving is excluded when calculating the period of time you have held a licence.

You will be issued with a P1 probationary driver licence if you are under 21 years of age and have held an overseas driver licence for less than 12 months from your 18th birthday.

    You will be issued with a P2 driver licence if you:

  • are under 21 years of age and have held a driver licence for more than 12 months; or
  • are 21 years of age or older and have held a driver licence for less than three years.

Victorian learner permit
You must be at least 16 years of age to obtain a Victorian learner permit (at least 18 years for a motorcycle). No age exemptions apply.

Learning to drive

Step 1 – before you get behind the wheel

Make sure you:

Who should I drive with?

You must only drive or ride while supervised by a person who holds and has held a current open licence for the class of vehicle you are learning to drive for at least 1 year.

If you are under 25 and learning to drive a car, make sure you record your driving experience in your learner logbook.

Step 2 – hitting the road

When learning to drive or ride, you must:

  • clearly display L-plates at the front and rear of the vehicle (rear only for motorbikes)
  • carry your learner licence with you and show it to a police officer when asked to do so
  • obey any conditions stated on your learner licence
  • not drive under the influence of illegal or prescription drugs
  • not use a mobile phone. Passengers and supervisors are also restricted from using a mobile phone in loudspeaker mode while the car is being driven
  • obey the zero alcohol limit (0.00).

Safe driving tips

  • Familiarise yourself with the basic controls. Make sure you have passed the checklist for car controls.
  • Take the time to adjust to different vehicles – some may have power steering, different brakes or mirrors.
  • Avoid getting behind the wheel when your mind is not on the driving task.
  • If you become tired while driving or riding, stop for a break.
  • Try not to turn the radio on as it may distract you and your supervisor.
  • Always allow extra time for travelling so you don’t have to rush.
  • Keep left unless overtaking.
  • Remember to be considerate of other road users and how your driving or riding affects them.

The RACQ has developed maps for learner drivers* to ensure they gain a range of experience while learning to drive. By following the routes on these maps you will practice different skills and experience a variety of driving situations.

Step 3 – practice

More driving experience will improve your chance of passing your practical driving test on your first attempt.

Safe driving tips

  • Weekly practice in a variety of situations is important in developing good driving skills.
  • Make every effort to drive in different conditions – in the dry, in the wet, during peak hour, at dusk and at night.
  • Always plan regular two-hourly breaks on a long journey.
  • Drive at a speed appropriate for the conditions.
  • Don’t drive if you are tired or have been drinking.