About darshandrive

Our Driving School in Melbourne provide special offer for automatic driving and manual driving lessons.See other Melbourne driving school compare our driving school lesson prices are cheap.

Australia Learner Licence

Australia Learner Licence

A learner licence is gained after: (a) the minimum driving age of 16 is met; (b) passing a touch-screen computer-based test Driver Knowledge Test; (c) provide identification; and (d) pass an eyesight test.[6] Learners are permitted to drive accompanied by a supervising unrestricted licence holder. Learners are subject to numerous restrictions: (a) a maximum speed of 90 km/h; (b) a zero blood alcohol content limit; (c) cannot tow a trailer; and (d) and must conspicuously display black-on-yellow “L-plates” on the exterior of the vehicle while driving. Learners must complete at least 120 hours of driving practice including 20 hours of night driving and hold the learner licence for at least 12 months before a provisional P1 licence is issued. Since 16 December 2009, one hour with an instructor is equal to three hours of normal driving hours until a total of ten hours with an instructor. This equates to a maximum of 30 hours which can be accumulated at an advanced rate .Since 19 December 2009, learner drivers 25 years old and over are not required to complete a learner driver log book and are exempt from the twelve-month tenure

Provisional P1 Licence

A provisional P1 licence (commonly called Ps and Reds) is gained after: (a) a minimum twelve months of holding a learner licence; (b) 120 hours (20 hours night drive between sunset and sunrise) of on-road driving experience; and (c) pass a driving test. The licence holder can drive unaccompanied but is limited to a maximum speed of 90 km/h, towing trailers of up to 250 kg  and a zero alcohol content. Red-on-white “P-plates” must be displayed while driving. P1 drivers are limited to a total of four demerit points during the term of the licence, as compared to the thirteen-point limit on unrestricted licences] P1 drivers must hold the licence for one year before progressing to the next stage.

Provisional P2 Licence

A provisional P2 licence (commonly known as Ps and Greens) is gained after one year and successful completion of a computerised hazard perception test. The driver is restricted to a speed limit of 100 km/h, a zero alcohol limit and a maximum of seven demerit points; however, they are eligible to upgrade the class of their licence, such as those for heavier vehicles.P2 drivers must conspicuously display a green-on-white “P-plate” on the exterior of the vehicle at all times. P2 drivers must hold the licence for two years before progressing to the next stage.

Full Licence
A full, unrestricted licence is gained after two years and successful completion of another computerized test. Unrestricted drivers licences are colored gold. More Read : www.darshandrivingschool.com.au

Drive responsibly and driving rules

Driving in traffic is more than just knowing how to operate the mechanisms which control the vehicle; it requires knowing how to apply the rules of the road (which govern safe and efficient sharing with other users). An effective driver also has an intuitive understanding of the basics of vehicle handling and can drive responsibly.

A driver is subject to the laws of the jurisdiction in which he or she is driving. Most countries also have differing laws against driving whilst under the influence of alcohol or drugs..Motorists are almost universally required to take lessons with an approved instructor and to pass a driving test before being granted a license. Almost all countries allow all adults with good vision and health to apply to take a driving test and, if successful, to drive on public roads.

A driving test (also known as a driving exam, driver’s test, or road test) is a procedure designed to test a person’s ability to drive amotor vehicle. It exists in various forms worldwide, and is often a requirement to obtain a driver’s license. A driving test generally consists of one or two parts: the practical test, called a road test, used to assess a person’s driving ability under normal operating conditions, and/or a written or oral test (theory test) to confirm a person’s knowledge of driving and relevant rules and laws.To make the test fair, written driving tests are normally standardized tests, meaning that everyone takes the same test under the same conditions. In many places the test can be done by computer, and typically consists of questions related to road signs and traffic laws of the respective country, but may also include questions related to road safety best practices or technical questions regarding vehicle operation and maintenance. In many countries passing a written driving test is required for admission to the practical test.

Depending on the country and on the driver’s license category, the practical test includes driving on the public, open road as well as different maneuverability test, which are usually carried out in a controlled environment such as:driving back and forth through a set of traffic cones reversing around a corner or into a parking space, with or without a trailer or semi-trailer emergency stops or evasive maneuvers coupling and de-coupling of a trailer to a truck, which includes establishing the electrical and compressed-air connections and checking them maintaining a motorcycle stable at low speed Make sure your children know the road rules when they are using a skateboard or scooter or similar device with wheels. This means they are in the best position to prevent any injury to themselves or to others. www.darshandrivingschool.com.au

Choosing a Driving School

Choosing professional driving instruction is one way to help ready yourself safely for the road.

A driver training course or high-school driver education program approved by the provincial government can teach you the skills and attitudes you need to be a safe and responsible driver. You may also be eligible to take your road test sooner and to save money on insurance premiums.

To help you choose the best driving school and course for you, use the following checklist of features:

  • Course information package
  • Audio visual equipment
  • Classroom facilities
  • In-vehicle topics covered
  • Risk perception and management
  • Driving in adverse conditions
  • Instructor qualifications and experience
  • Student progress and evaluation reports
  • Minimum 25 classroom and 10 behind-
    the-wheel instruction hours
  • Certification fee
  • Tuition receipts
  • Testimonials
  • Personalized program
  • Low student/teacher ratio
  • Basic man oeuvres
  • Strategic driving
  • Freeway driving
  • Night driving
  • Regular instructor upgrading
  • Certificate of completion
  • Training materials
  • Use of vehicle for road test
  • Registered educational institution
  • Number of years in business
  • Consumer protection insurance

offences resulting in driving licence cancellation

Drink or drug driving offence
If your licence has been cancelled solely because of a drink or drug driving offence, your re-licensing requirements will vary depending on circumstances. The requirements are explained in the brochure Getting your licence back [PDF, 327KB, 12pp] . You may also be subjected to an alcohol interlock order as part of the re-issuing condition of your licence.

Other offences resulting in licence cancellation or driving disqualification
If your licence has been cancelled or you have been disqualified from driving because of one of the offences listed below, you must apply to the Court to have your licence restored to you. This is called a Licence Eligibility Order (LEO).

• Serious motor vehicle offence
• Police pursuit offence
• Stealing or attempting to steal a vehicle offence
• Non-road safety offence


Before you apply for an LEO, please ensure that all driving bans requiring a LEO have been completed before the LEO hearing.

For more information on what you are required to do in order to apply to become re-licensed, check out the Driver’s Licence Eligibility Guide on the Magistrate’s Court of Victoria website.
I’ve received my LEO from the Court – what next?
Once you have received your LEO from the court you will need to attend a VicRoads Customer Service Centre with your LEO to have your licence re-issued or to book your learner permit test.

If you have outstanding driving bans on your record, VicRoads will not be able to re-issue your licence until all outstanding bans have been served. If any of these outstanding bans require an LEO, you must return to Court to obtain an LEO at the end of these bans. It is therefore recommended that you serve all of your bans and obtain one LEO to cover all bans.

If you were found to have committed the offence under the influence of alcohol, on granting the LEO, the Court may order the imposition of an Alcohol Interlock condition on your licence or permit.
If you’re a probationary driver and your licence has been suspended due to a non-road safety offence, your probationary period will be extended by the same period as your suspension period.
Alcohol interlocks
The Court may impose a condition requiring an alcohol interlock device to be fitted to your vehicle for a period of time.

Information relating to the Alcohol Interlock can be found on the Alcohol Interlocks website.

Driver Education Programs and assessments
If you commit a drink driving or drug driving offence you may be required to complete an education course or obtain assessment reports to get your licence back or to avoid having your licence cancelled.

All drink drive assessments and courses are developed, administered and conducted by the Department of Human Services. www.darshandrivingschool.com.au

Road safety benefits

Road safety benefits
Research from around the world has shown that ISA can significantly reduce travel speeds and threfore crashes. Research undertaken by the TAC and MUARC in Australia estimates that ISA can reduce fatal and serious injury crashes by up to eight per cent.

VicRoads Repeat Speeders Trial
The results of a landmark study of Victorian motorists with a history of speeding has found that using speed alert devices can reduce speeding and potentially save lives.

VicRoads designed and conducted two trials; one involving repeat speeders attending a behaviour change discussion group, while the other used advisory ISA technology to warn drivers they were speeding. Researchers from the Monash University Accident Research Centre independently evaluated the trials.

Environmental benefits
Local and international research also indicates that the use of ISA produces fewer fluctuations in travel speed which results in a higher fuel efficiency and a subsequent decrease in vehicle emissions.

Some portable satellite navigation (GPS) devices already have speed limit information in them and can be set to provide a warning to drivers if they travel over the speed limit. www.darshandrivingschool.com.au

Crossing the road safely

Pedestrians have to share the road with vehicles so it is important they take care when crossing the road.

As a pedestrian, plan where you will walk and always choose the safest place to cross a road.

Safe places to cross

  • Whenever possible, cross at a pedestrian crossing, traffic signal or pedestrian refuge.
  • Make sure you have a clear view of approaching traffic, and where drivers can see you.
  • If you cannot cross the whole road in one attempt, wait on the pedestrian refuge or median strip.

Crossings
Even at crossings you still need to remain alert and check whether vehicles are stopping for you. Always make sure traffic has actually stopped before stepping onto the road.

Remember school crossings are legally active only when the flags are displayed. If a crossing attendant is on duty, cross only when he or she indicates that it is safe.

Using a signalised pedestrian crossing

  • A green man means you can cross, if it is safe to do so
  • A flashing red man means you can continue to cross but should not start crossing
  • A steady red man means do not start to cross – wait until the green man before beginning to cross

Crossing the road at other places

  • Walk straight across the road – don’t jay-walk.
  • Keep checking in both directions to make sure the way is clear.
  • Do not cross the road from between parked cars as drivers may not see you.
  • Try not to cross near trees or bushes because drivers may not see you.
  • Avoid crossing near a bend or crest in the road. Give yourself a good chance to see vehicles coming from both directions.
  • Avoid crossing on roundabouts, particularly multi lane roundabouts as they are very busy and complex and cars are not required to give way to you, unless there is a pedestrian crossing. Find somewhere further away from the roundabout to safely cross the road.

Crossing at railway level crossings

At railway level crossings, don’t cross the level crossing if there are warning lights, boom gates are closed (or closing or opening). Wait for the bells and lights to stop and the boom barriers to be raised before crossing. Many crashes occur because pedestrians cross immediately after a train, not realising a second train is coming.

Crossing at tram stops
At tram stops, don’t cross the road to get on a tram until the tram has stopped at the tram stop.  Make sure traffic has seen you and is stopping before you step out onto the road to get on or off the tram.  When you get off the tram you must cross to the nearest footpath by the shortest safe route. Walking around the front or rear of a tram to cross a road is extremely risky as drivers cannot see you. www.darshandrivingschool.com.au

Road safety for children on skateboards, scooters and wheeled toys

Any wheeled device on the road is regarded the same as pedestrians under the road rules. This includes skateboards, rollerblades, children’s scooters, pedal cars or tricycles – any wheeled toys.

As well as general pedestrian rules, there are also additional rules that parents should know and ensure that their child not only knows, but understands. Most of the suggestions we outline for walking and road safety as well as bicycle road safety also apply to wheeled toys.

Road safety for children on skateboards, scooters and wheeled toys

Below are some tips for children using a range of wheeled toys and devices near roads.

  • Wheeled devices or toys cannotbe used:
    • on a road with a speed limit of more than 60 km/h
    • on a road with a dividing line or median strip or
    • on a one-way road with more than one marked lane
  • They must keep to the left on footpaths and shared paths and give way to pedestrians.
  • Unless a sign prohibits it, a person on roller blades, roller skates or a similar wheeled device can ride on a bicycle path or separated footpath designed for the use of bicycles, but must give way to any bicyclist.
  • It is an offence (and extremely dangerous) to hold on to a moving vehicle
  • Correct fitting helmets must be worn

Make sure your children know the road rules when they are using a skateboard or scooter or similar device with wheels. This means they are in the best position to prevent any injury to themselves or to others. www.darshandrivingschool.com.au