Australia Learner Licence

Australia Learner Licence

A learner licence is gained after: (a) the minimum driving age of 16 is met; (b) passing a touch-screen computer-based test Driver Knowledge Test; (c) provide identification; and (d) pass an eyesight test.[6] Learners are permitted to drive accompanied by a supervising unrestricted licence holder. Learners are subject to numerous restrictions: (a) a maximum speed of 90 km/h; (b) a zero blood alcohol content limit; (c) cannot tow a trailer; and (d) and must conspicuously display black-on-yellow “L-plates” on the exterior of the vehicle while driving. Learners must complete at least 120 hours of driving practice including 20 hours of night driving and hold the learner licence for at least 12 months before a provisional P1 licence is issued. Since 16 December 2009, one hour with an instructor is equal to three hours of normal driving hours until a total of ten hours with an instructor. This equates to a maximum of 30 hours which can be accumulated at an advanced rate .Since 19 December 2009, learner drivers 25 years old and over are not required to complete a learner driver log book and are exempt from the twelve-month tenure

Provisional P1 Licence

A provisional P1 licence (commonly called Ps and Reds) is gained after: (a) a minimum twelve months of holding a learner licence; (b) 120 hours (20 hours night drive between sunset and sunrise) of on-road driving experience; and (c) pass a driving test. The licence holder can drive unaccompanied but is limited to a maximum speed of 90 km/h, towing trailers of up to 250 kg  and a zero alcohol content. Red-on-white “P-plates” must be displayed while driving. P1 drivers are limited to a total of four demerit points during the term of the licence, as compared to the thirteen-point limit on unrestricted licences] P1 drivers must hold the licence for one year before progressing to the next stage.

Provisional P2 Licence

A provisional P2 licence (commonly known as Ps and Greens) is gained after one year and successful completion of a computerised hazard perception test. The driver is restricted to a speed limit of 100 km/h, a zero alcohol limit and a maximum of seven demerit points; however, they are eligible to upgrade the class of their licence, such as those for heavier vehicles.P2 drivers must conspicuously display a green-on-white “P-plate” on the exterior of the vehicle at all times. P2 drivers must hold the licence for two years before progressing to the next stage.

Full Licence
A full, unrestricted licence is gained after two years and successful completion of another computerized test. Unrestricted drivers licences are colored gold. More Read : www.darshandrivingschool.com.au

Drive responsibly and driving rules

Driving in traffic is more than just knowing how to operate the mechanisms which control the vehicle; it requires knowing how to apply the rules of the road (which govern safe and efficient sharing with other users). An effective driver also has an intuitive understanding of the basics of vehicle handling and can drive responsibly.

A driver is subject to the laws of the jurisdiction in which he or she is driving. Most countries also have differing laws against driving whilst under the influence of alcohol or drugs..Motorists are almost universally required to take lessons with an approved instructor and to pass a driving test before being granted a license. Almost all countries allow all adults with good vision and health to apply to take a driving test and, if successful, to drive on public roads.

A driving test (also known as a driving exam, driver’s test, or road test) is a procedure designed to test a person’s ability to drive amotor vehicle. It exists in various forms worldwide, and is often a requirement to obtain a driver’s license. A driving test generally consists of one or two parts: the practical test, called a road test, used to assess a person’s driving ability under normal operating conditions, and/or a written or oral test (theory test) to confirm a person’s knowledge of driving and relevant rules and laws.To make the test fair, written driving tests are normally standardized tests, meaning that everyone takes the same test under the same conditions. In many places the test can be done by computer, and typically consists of questions related to road signs and traffic laws of the respective country, but may also include questions related to road safety best practices or technical questions regarding vehicle operation and maintenance. In many countries passing a written driving test is required for admission to the practical test.

Depending on the country and on the driver’s license category, the practical test includes driving on the public, open road as well as different maneuverability test, which are usually carried out in a controlled environment such as:driving back and forth through a set of traffic cones reversing around a corner or into a parking space, with or without a trailer or semi-trailer emergency stops or evasive maneuvers coupling and de-coupling of a trailer to a truck, which includes establishing the electrical and compressed-air connections and checking them maintaining a motorcycle stable at low speed Make sure your children know the road rules when they are using a skateboard or scooter or similar device with wheels. This means they are in the best position to prevent any injury to themselves or to others. www.darshandrivingschool.com.au